Ghost

My Button Collection

situpsandfruitcups:

Benefits of big hips:

Laundry basket rest
Yoga pants
Tiny human rest
Full size human rest
Hip checking those who challenge you
Ability to swing them wider than a cadillac
Model walk is 10x more dramatic
Taking up more space
Looking like a fertility goddess

ultrafacts:




Source Want more facts? Why not follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts? Why not follow Ultrafacts

tennisballstentacles:

Some people are constructive with their evenings… I make a Doo family tree

tennisballstentacles:

Some people are constructive with their evenings… I make a Doo family tree

That's a given, you are the cheeto the universe needs, but not the cheeto the universe deserves. Anonymous

Anon, I have never been more touched in my whole life and when my world is falling to chip crumbs I will return to this ask and keep you close in my heart

instagram:

Local Lens: Reflections of Singapore’s Changing Cityscape

To see more of Singapore’s diverse architecture through the lens of a local, follow @_yafiqyusman_ on Instagram.

“The places I can go are limited,” says Instagrammer Yafiq Yusman (@_yafiqyusman_) of his tiny island-nation home of Singapore, “but the photo possibilities are limitless.”

Yafiq, who studied architecture in college, enjoys capturing Singapore’s rapidly evolving urban landscape through puddles left by the city’s tropical climate. “Singapore is a modernized country, but there are still places where you can see the olden days,” says Yafiq. “The alleys in Little India, China Town and Boat Quay are a few of my favorite spots and great for puddle shots.”

For more modern photo opportunities, Yafiq favors Raffles Place, a square surrounded by the city’s tallest buildings. And for those seeking respite from Singapore’s fast-paced metropolis, he suggests tracking down a hidden reserve called Punggol Beach. “The best time to visit is during the sunset. It’s beautiful.”

wildhogs2007:

wildhogs2007:

i seriously just had the thought “i wonder if I could rush from the computer to the top of the fridge to squat in the 3 seconds photobooth gives me”

image

eatsleepdraw:

Gif illustration about clear cuttingErik J. Hayes

eatsleepdraw:

Gif illustration about clear cutting
Erik J. Hayes

*insert love letter* Anonymous

Does it say I’m the greatest cheeto alive??????

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.
"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.
"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.
Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.
Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.
One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.
Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "

In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.

"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.

Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.

Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.

One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.

Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.

Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

(Source: NPR)

rainsfell:

how do i get over someone who i never dated

qwanderer:

thisisevenharderthannamingablog:

girl-farts:

kingcheddarxvii:

notviolet:

Chris Pratt Interrupts Interview To French Braid Intern’s Hair

SHUT THE HELL U P

this man has gone too far

damn

Where does Marvel FIND these people?

Imagine - Chris Pratt and Jeremy Renner show up to your door the night of prom and your parents are like WHY DO YOU HAVE TWO DATES AND WHY ARE THEY SO BIG AND BEEFY AND INTIMIDATING but Chris is just like “Nah I’m hair” and Jeremy raises his hand and says “And I’m makeup”

(Source: chrisprattdelicious)

weaknudes:

waking up cold: alright I need more blankies

waking up hot: covers thrown everywhere. sweat behind the kneecaps. 3 dead. the pillow is the sun. critical condition.

(Source: thiccthot)

'Cute, Marie, real cute.'